Running

We’re going to send a team from Country Dream to the 2009 TDAA Petit Prix. And, it is our intention to make a good showing for ourselves. Consequently we will be practicing all of the games that will be played at the Petit Prix so that we have an advantage of understanding.

With that in mind, I’m to be the team coach. What I really would like to do is have my team ready for a take no prisoners kind of game. And that begins with running. So every week we’ll practice not just proficient technical performance. I don’t want to have to ask that question… what would it look like if you were in a hurry? We’re going to play constantly as though we are in a race with the devil.

I’m constantly wondering whether we’ve forgotten to run in this country… or that we never knew it.

The course I’ve designed here is intended as a Who Dares Wins course. That’s the game to be played as the final round of the Petit Prix. And we’re going to give a great deal of thought to the strategy of the game; and we’ll spend weeks and weeks calibrating our dogs’ working speed. It begins here.

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The basic premise of Who Dares Wins is for the handler to guess how much work he can do in a given amount of time, say 50 seconds. So, looking at this course, how long would it take you to do the course with your dog? It’s not quite enough to know how fast you would do this course because in this game you can repeat the course or a portion of the course; and the more daring you are in your guess, the greater your chances of winning, so long as you can deliver on your guess.

At the end of the dog’s run he needs to be directed to the table to stop time. So rather than beginning at obstacle #1 the handler will begin his dog at whatever obstacle leads to the end of course. Do you follow that logic?

I’ll talk more about this game and all the other games at the 2009 TDAA Petit Prix in due course.

From Fire to Fire

It seems like I’m running from fire to fire these days, trying to catch up on obligations. Today is pretty much given over to TDAA business as the last few have. I’m reviewing courses, while finishing up the 2009 Petit Prix Tournament rules. Also Spring is threatening to be here. The lawns are greening up; the first Robin of the year is mudding in the front yard; and at least the maples are pushing out optimistic buds. All the old timers of course warn that there can still be a killing frost. I’ve several out of doors chores that have gone unattended. I guess the next couple of weeks will be full of excitement and manual labor.

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston: BudHouston@hughes.net. And Check out my new publication the Idea BookAgility Training for a Small Universe available at www.dogagility.org/store.

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2 Responses to “Running”

  1. Michelle Says:

    OK, I think I would start with #14 to get some speed over the aframe, do a qick release a the aframe , then the tire and then complete the course without fault. Of course I would be running Hazard, not Presley….
    Michelle

  2. budhouston Says:

    That was a good guess Michelle. Actually, Hazard had the high score… but started at jump #10. I do need to talk more about this game to get everyone ready for the Petit Prix. It makes me wonder if I should save the good stuff for me. lol

    Regards,
    Bud

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