Who is the Top Dog?

Only time will tell!

It’s been a hardworking and somewhat bittersweet week. I went back through all the records of the TDAA and identified all the winners of the Petit Prix, by jump height since its inception. We have retroactively conferred upon all of those winners the Teacup National Agility Champions title.

The list of title winners is published here: http://k9tdaa.com/prixresults.php

Bittersweet ~ I have two dogs who are gone over the bridge. Bogie and Birdie had between them five national championships. I miss  my boys.

Hardworking ~ As the league secretary for Top Dog Agility Players I’ve selected two numbered courses and a game (the Minuet) for play. If you would like to play these with us you need to go to www.dogagility.org and download the posting file. It’s a very simple matter: set the course up; play and score it; then report your results.

Since this is my blog and I can do whatever I want, I figured I’d share each of the TDAP events. I’ve cut the standard course to the size of the Queen City competition floor (no actual pressure Erica!) I’ll keep challenging them until they come on board.

113012A86x98 a numbered course

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This is a numbered course, judged under TDAP rules.

Competition shall be conducted by a judge and stewards appointed for specific tasks in conduct of the event. No certification process exists for judges. TDAP will rely on good sense in the selection of experienced persons to perform this task. A judge is initially registered with TDAP upon submitted event results.

The judge or appointed stewards shall observe and signal course or game faults or points. The judge alone will sign off on competition results.

The Event Closing Date is December 21, 2012.

113012B60x90 a game: The Minuet

The Minuet was invented by Bud Houston at Dogwood Training Center in Ostrander, OH as a physical conditioning exercise for his dogs and a training game for his students. The game was first played in 2001 in Dogwood’s ongoing agility league. On the surface, the Minuet is a simple game with a simple sequence repeated over and over again. In fact, the game will expose every flaw in movement the handler might have as the handler must also repeat his movement over and over again. There will be dropped bars, refusals and even off courses. This game demonstrates a simple principal. Most performance faults are the fault of the handler and not of the dog.

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Briefing

The dog and handler have 50 seconds. Repeat the sequence as a continuous loop until the expiration of time. The dog must go to the table to stop time after the whistle blows to end scoring.

Scoring

The Minuet is scored Points, Then Time.

One point is earned for each completion of the loop. One decimal point is earned for each jump in an uncompleted loop when time expires. For example: In 50 seconds, the dog does 7 complete loops and the first two obstacles in the sequence. The dog’s score shall be 7.2.

If the dog drops a bar, the handler must stop and reset the bar.

If the dog goes off course the current loop is lost. The dog must return to the first obstacle in the loop to resume.

Strategies

Surviving the Minuet requires simple discipline. The handler should work in clean lines through the jumps and show turns only after the dog has committed to each jump. These are simple disciplines that keep the bars up and help prevent refusals. If the handler’s movement gets lazy, something bad is bound to happen.

Please note that in any game with a finite number of possible scores, time to the table will very often determine placement. When the time whistle blows, don’t dawdle. Get to the table as quick as possible.

Qualification

To earn a qualifying score, the dog must score 5 points or more.

113012A70x70 a numbered course

Historical Footnote: This was the first standard course played at the TDAA Petit Prix Eastern Regional in Latrobe, PA on October 26, 2012. The dogs that played on that day will be included in the event results.

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This is a numbered course, judged under the rules of the Teacup Dogs Agility Association (TDAA). The course requires equipment of the preferred specification. Refer to the rules of the TDAA at: www.k9tdaa.com.

Abridgement to Rules: In this competition, as at the TDAA Petit Prix, event judges are instructed to assign a score of “20” faults for each failure to perform rather than a score of “E”.

Competition shall be conducted by a judge and stewards appointed for specific tasks in conduct of the event. No certification process exists for judges. TDAP will rely on good sense in the selection of experienced persons to perform this task. A judge is initially registered with TDAP upon submitted event results.

The judge or appointed stewards shall observe and signal course or game faults or points. The judge alone will sign off on competition results.

The Event Closing Date is December 21, 2012.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. I have five volumes (over 100 pp each) of The Joker’s Notebook available on my web-store at an inexpensive price. These are lesson plans suitable for individual or group classes for teaching dog to work at a distance.

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One Response to “Who is the Top Dog?”

  1. Jim Porterfield Says:

    What five national championships do you have between Bogie and and Birdie?

    I, also, miss my Thelma, (Pem Corgi), who had 243 career AKC first placements, over 70 second placements, was No. 1 AKC pem corgi in 2005 and 2007, and No. 2 in 2006. Placed 3rd in ISC competition jumping 14 inches, with some world-class dogs competing. What are your five national championships?
    Sincerely, happy holidays,
    Jim Porterfield
    Pittsburgh, Pa.

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