Progressive Sending and Kentucky Windage

January 14, 2017

This is an ongoing series intended as homework for Canine Manners distance seminar students; March 20 and 21 2017 in Broken Arrow, OK, (and others interested in training great distance skills who might visit these pages).

In the following discussion we’ll use bits from the January 2017 Masters league course for the National Dog Agility League. It is a reasonable practice to find training opportunities in the set of the floor.

Around the Clock ~ A Progressive Sending Exercise

Everybody wants to learn distance work. The real difficulty of distance work is two-fold: a) the dog must know how to perform obstacles independent of the handler; and b) the dog needs to be taught that he has permission to work at a distance from the handler.

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So we begin the day with an obstacle conditioning exercise on the tire that I call “Around the Clock”. The handler works at positions on the clock-face sending the dog to seek out the aperture and go through. Upon which the handler will mark the performance (praise or clicker) and then reward the dog. The first position is at 6:00 and then at 5:00, then at 4:00 and finally at 3:00. 3:00 o’clock is perhaps the toughest position because the dog will have to go out, give himself a square approach and the jump through.

As we work, the clock-face should expand. At first the handler works closely, represented by the white numbers; and then sends from a greater distance, represented by the black numbers.

I’ve put this exercise on a YouTube video. Though I didn’t use a tire, you can at least see the pace I set for this training.

Using Kentucky Windage in the Dead-away Send

The following illustrates a simple kind of distance challenge; send the dog away over two jumps, into a pipe tunnel, and call him back.

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You’ll note in this illustration that the dog is set square to the first jump. When my students do this kind of thing, it makes the hair in my beard turn grey. And don’t you know, I have a pretty grey beard these days.

The dog should not be set square to the first jump… the dog should be set square to the course which, as you can see is off to the right.

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Setting the dog up for a straight line for jumps #1 and #2 mightn’t be enough as a compelling option has been placed to the left. One of the Laws of a Dog in Motion says: “A dog forward of the handler tends to curl back to the handler’s position.”

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A thoughtful handler might begin with dog on left so that the dog has nothing to curl to, on the side of the handler. That doesn’t mean the dog won’t curl… and if he did, it would certainly spoil the send. In any case, the handler had better have reliable left & right directionals to direct the dog after jump #2.

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What the savvy handler will do in this case is use a bit of Kentucky Windage, leaning the shot into the wind so that the curl brings the dog to target.

You will note that in the last blog entry we showed a YouTube video of “Strategy for a Distance Handler” in the opening of the January 2017 course. In this video Marsha Houston very intentionally uses Kentucky Windage as insurance for solving the two-tunnel discrimination that opens the course:

Notes Aside

  1. Another of the Laws of a Dog in Motion worth mentioning is this: “Nothing straightens the line like the certainty in the mind of a well-trained dog.” So the tendency to curl back toward the handler when the dog is ahead mightn’t be as big a risk for the superbly trained distance dogs. But I, for one, believe in insurance.
  2. Feel free to attend the written homework. All of these skills are documented in The Joker’s Notebook issue #0: Progressive sending (to the #2 pipe tunnel); [JN00 “Around the Clock” p 46-47; “Progressive Sending” p 59.] The send to the pipe tunnel begs that you understand the principles of Kentucky Windage; [JN00 “A Discussion of Kentucky Windage” p 63-65.]
  3. The problem with YouTube is that you have to download a video every time you look at it. Unfortunately the quality of the presentation is tied to the bandwidth of the download. So it can be a pain to watch a video of any size because the picture stops or stalls as the download buffer catches up. It’s downright painful, especially if you have a less than optimum internet connection. Furthermore, we mostly get charged for our use of that bandwidth. So if you want to watch a YouTube more than once, you pay for it in bandwidth every time you watch it. YouTube does not make the video resident on your computer. I use a utility called aTube Catcher (Studio Suite DsNET Corp). It is absolutely free and it’s easy to use. The link to the official site to download your own copy of aTube Catcher:

http://www.atube.me/video/

Play with the NDAL

New clubs are always welcome to join the National Dog Agility League. Preview our January courses here:

http://natldogagilityleague.com/blog/2017/01/02/january-2017-ndal-courses/

Contact us if you are interested in joining play. Getting started with the NDAL is simple.

Like the NDAL on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopDogAgilityPlayers/

Visit the NDAL blog: http://natldogagilityleague.com/blog/

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Strategy for a Distance Handler

January 12, 2017

This is an ongoing series intended as homework for Canine Manners distance seminar students; March 20 and 21 2017 in Broken Arrow, OK, (and others interested in training great distance skills who might visit these pages). Canine Manners is an active franchise in the National Dog Agility League. It is useful to use the NDAL courses as a context for the study of teaching the agility dog an independent performance (sometimes called… distance work).

As I study the January 2017 Masters league course for the National Dog Agility League I can’t help but see the course through the lens of a distance handler running a dog that is perfectly comfortable with independent performance.

At the same time it’s clear that the plan I’ve devised for myself has a list of prerequisite skills. Allow me to demonstrate:

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Plotting only the first four obstacles of this course serves up, for me, a list of prerequisite skills. On the course map I’ve drawn a line to demonstrate exactly what I want to do as a handler. I want to move in a straight line from the start to a position intermediate to the A-frame and the pipe tunnel at #4. The transition between #3 and #4 is a “technical moment” and requires the handler to be right in the big middle of the action.

The skills list includes, from the start:

  1. A send to the pipe tunnel;
  2. Performance of the A-frame at a lateral distance;
  3. A back-pass in the transition from #3 to #4

Are you ready for some homework? In the next few days we will talk about each of these skills; and provide YouTube videos to demonstrate. If you practice any of these sequences feel free to send me your videos so that they can be used for illustration and comment on the pages of this web log.

Feel free to attend the written homework. All of these skills are documented in The Joker’s Notebook issue #0:

Progressive sending (to the #2 pipe tunnel); [JN00 “Around the Clock” p 46-47; “Progressive Sending” p 59; “Training & Handling #2 p 122.]

The send to the pipe tunnel begs that you understand the principles of Kentucky Windage; [JN00 “A Discussion of Kentucky Windage” p 63-65.]

Performance of the A-frame with the handler at a lateral distance; [JN00 “Unambiguous Contact Finish” p 19-22; “Back to the Abridged Training Plan” p 60; “Lateral Distance” p 92; “Lateral Distance Work on Technical Obstacles” p 94.]

A Back Pass on the approach to the #4 pipe tunnel; [JN00 “Come By” p 28-29]. Note that the discussion of the Back Pass when this issue of the Joker’s Notebook was written is quite primitive. We’ve learned a lot about the movement since then.

Illustration of Concept

We couldn’t leave this page without having video as a proof of concept. The video shows Marsha Houston running her wild dog, Phoenix, in the opening four obstacles of the January Masters NDAL league course.

Notes Aside

Play with the NDAL

New clubs are always welcome to join the National Dog Agility League. Preview the NDAL January courses here:

http://natldogagilityleague.com/blog/2017/01/02/january-2017-ndal-courses/

Contact us if you are interested in joining play. Getting started with the NDAL is simple.

Like the NDAL on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopDogAgilityPlayers/

Visit the NDAL blog: http://natldogagilityleague.com/blog/

Page Number References

Yesterday I began this series as a context for homework for distance seminar students at Canine Manners, March 20 and 21 2017 in Broken Arrow, OK. In that discussion I failed to refer to page numbers in The Jokers Notebook (issue #0). When I have this page published I shall go back to that blog post and edit it to include the JN00 page number references.

The crazy thing about page numbering is that as I work I am editing the original issue #0 to include the YouTube recordings that so nicely illustrate the teaching from the original text. This means, of course, that when I republish issue #0 all of the page numbering from this blog will no longer match up.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Homework for K9Manners

January 11, 2017

Canine Manners distance seminar students… this blog is for you!

On March 20 and 21 2017 I shall be in Broken Arrow, OK to lead a Distance Skills seminar. We’ve concocted a unique and fun format in which I will post nearly daily homework exercises in the lead-up to that clinic.

A distance seminar is a devilish thing. You must know that “independent performance” is all about training the dog. You don’t do it in a minute. And, frankly, you don’t do it in a couple days. Dog training is a patient and daily discipline that can easily span month and, in some cases, years.

So, it is my objective in the ten weeks leading up to this seminar to share about a year’s worth of dog training work. I will introduce foundation exercises. And when I have students in front of my we can do an assessment of

Our reference for this training shall be The Jokers Notebook, issue #0. You’ll find this workbook in our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore.

Lesson 1 “Go On” Intro for Baby Dog

Go On is a very basic directional command. It means, continue working in a straight line without regard to the handler’s position or movement. Go On is the basic command verb, and may be punctuated with commands for specific obstacles.

Part 1 ~ As we were working with a very young dog, we used the “hoop” obstacle which is a staple for play in NADAC. There’s no jumping involved and so it is completely appropriate for a young dog. As far as that goes, a jump with the bar laying on the ground would serve just as well.

Part 2 ~ Adding depth and dimension

Once the dog understands the basic performance of a single obstacle we can add some depth to the exercise by adding more of that obstacle. Note that the training method is quite simple. When the dog gets it right there will be praise and reward. When the dog fails to finish the praise and reward are denied. The handler shouldn’t apply a negative marker. Allow the dog to sort out what it takes to earn the reward.

Part 3 ~ Modest Incremental Escalation

Each day we spread out the jumps or hoops… just a few inches. It doesn’t take very long for the distance to become impressive. In our example below we’ve included a pipe tunnel at the end of the line of hoops. And the tunnel is “framed” to the dog by the hoops.

Lesson 2 “Go On” Intro for a Mature Dog

If you think your dog already has decent focus for the jumps you can certainly begin with a slightly more advanced introduction to “Go On”. The YouTube below demonstrates this very nicely.

Notes Aside

Okay, I haven’t written to my personal blog for a long time. I’ve been blogging, of course, but not here. Most of my writing has been going to the Teacup Dogs (TDAA) blog, and to the National Dog Agility League (NDAL) blog.

I return to these pages expressly to for my upcoming seminar (March 20 and 21 2017) with Canine Manners in Broken Arrow, Giving out homework in advance is kind of a unique approach to a seminar. But don’t you know, teaching skills to a dog, especially teaching the dog to work independently at a distance demands that we engage in a very specific and intentional training program that frankly requires months and months of diligent work. It doesn’t happen on a single weekend.

Other people may also use the instruction that’s coming in the following 60 days or so. You are all welcome. A couple of old friends and associates have recently acquired new pups. I invite you, friends… to follow along. A dogs skills in working at a distance are earned and deserved through training and practice. Without training and practice they are neither earned, nor deserved.

ALSO… I’m going to use this opportunity to update the Joker’s Notebook issue #0 and embed the YouTube recordings that illustrate the teaching in the book. There’s something very two dimensional about the written word. The visual expression of those words might really make a difference in bringing home basic training concepts to a student of the game.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Dog Agility Championship of the World

December 11, 2016

This is a proposal warranting discussion by the NDAL Board of Governors.

The NDAL Secretary has prepared a summary analysis of each of the four NDAL leagues for each of the first three quarterly series in 2016. You can download that summary (an Excel file) HERE.

The opportunity presents itself to compete for the Dog Agility Championship of the World. In a play-off between the top four league teams. The Board should provide input to determine what shape that competition might take. The simple approach would be to designate one of the games or courses from January 2017 (which would additionally be a league game for the 1st quarter series of 2017). The team with the highest score in that competition would win the first ever Dog Agility Championship of the world.

As of this date, the winning clubs in each of the four leagues for first three series of the year were:

50×50 ~ Sit, Stay, ‘N Play in Stroudsburg, PA

50×70 ~ Clermont County All Breed All Stars in Milford, OH

60×90 ~ Clermont County All Breed All Stars in Milford, OH

36×85 ~ Wicked West Australians in Banjup, Western Australia

One club has won two leagues. In order to find a fourth, “wildcard” team we look for the team with the lowest percentage differential from the winning team of each league. As of this date the Wildcard team would be: AQ4U’s Fast & Furryous in Louisville, KY.

Logistical Hurdles

The leagues of the NDAL are based on two elements: Size of the working space and the intended level of challenge. For the Dog Agility Championship of the World the NDAL Board must settle on each of these elements.

The 50×70 might be the ideal. Clearly Sit, Stay, ‘n Play will be at a disadvantage here because the 50×50 league was created specifically to match their available working space. We need to hear from Sit, Stay, ‘n Play to find out if they can find a suitable venue for this competition. There is an excellent agility facility within about 50 miles of their site.

Top Dog 2016

A summary of individual dogs in league play is underway. The Board needs to discuss. Qualifying shall be based on LPP earned in 2016 league competition. Furthermore, this gives us an excellent opportunity to recognize dogs by their measured jump height. Consequently the Top Dog Agility Champion will be seeded with 16 dogs; four in each of our four measured heights.

Open Invitation

Qualification for the Dog Agility Championship of the World is based on earned LPP by each team in 2016. We will invite new teams to and individual to compete and register their scores in that competition. But only the finalist clubs will be eligible for the win.

In the Open Invitation the NDAL will require: 1) Dogs to be registered; 2) a recording fee; 3) YouTube recording for each performance.

Invitation to Game Masters

If you would like to try your hand at designing league courses for the NDAL, please contact our League Secretary: Houston.Bud@gmail.com.

Facebook

Follow us on Facebook to for current league news: https://www.facebook.com/TopDogAgilityPlayers/

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

NDAL August 50×70 Training Notes

September 15, 2016

What you make of your own training sessions with any set of the floor probably has a lot to do with your own objectives and assuredly the goals and objectives of your students. Be warned that the following discussion has more to do with my own quick assessment of training opportunity, rather than anything for the average player in our sport.

The 50×70 is a wide open ripper, maybe about as challenging as a NADAC course. And so our training sets won’t necessarily be focused on how to solve for the technical challenge. Being something of a racetrack, our training objectives might be to work on distance foundation and fundamentals to which this course lends itself very nicely.

We’ll begin with a Progressive sending exercise:

In the same training session we will also do a bit of work on “layering”. Note that we begin to use compound objectives in our training (progressive send, left & right directionals, layering and named obstacle recognition):

September NDAL League Courses

New clubs are invited to establish an NDAL franchise at any time. The cost for playing is ridiculously low. You can find the September NDAL league courses, and links to score-keeping worksheets here:

http://natldogagilityleague.com/blog/2016/08/31/ndal-september-2016-league-courses/

Facebook

Follow us on Facebook to for current league news: https://www.facebook.com/TopDogAgilityPlayers/

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

NDAL 60×90 Masters Training Sets

September 11, 2016

I’ve been an instructor and a coach in agility for more than 25 years. Writing a lesson plan is an art form, I suppose, intended in the main to elevate the keenness of handling and raise the training objectives with an individual dog.

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The NDAL 60×90 Masters course was of my own design. I’m happy to report that October will be designed by Stuart Mah, author of Course Design for Dog Agility, a foundation reference in our sport.

I would like to share with you some of the intended exercises for my own handler classes that are scheduled for the upcoming week. I’ve published a lot of training sequences and advice over the years. But now I have wonderful resources afforded by more modern technologies… and the internet. So, the training sequences are embellished with online YouTube recordings!

We will observe a training method called a “break-down”. In the break-down format we practice the elements of a course. And once we believe we have those elements mastered, we will run the course!

The 60×90 Course Overview

The Masters level course for the 60×90 floor space are intended to feature advanced challenges, with considerable flow, allowing interesting technical moments to come to the dog and handler at full speed.

Exercise #1 ~ Tight Wrap at jump #2

The simple objective of this exercise is to practice a tight wrapping turn at jump #2. This is a marvelous opportunity to experiment with a pre-cued turn, focusing on what any individual dog needs to give advice of an impending turn at a jump.

The transition from the “wrap” at jump #1 around the front of the floor to the teeter isn’t featured as a practice sequence. Ideally the handler can direct the dog at a distance. Distance requires the dog to work independently, and might encourage the dog to work at full speed which, with any luck, is faster than a handler might be able to move.

Exercise #2 ~ Independent Performance of the Teeter

On this course it is somewhat desirable for the dog to perform the teeter at some distance from the handler. This allows the handler to take a control position for the approach to the weave poles.

Exercise #3 ~ Weave Pole Entry

The approach to the weave poles isn’t a simple matter. The pipe tunnel looms as a wrong-course option. And, ultimately, the handler probably want dog on right for the weave pole performance. The handler who must shape the approach to the weave poles is especially challenged to set up that approach. In the ideal world, the handler would be able to give a cue to the weave poles, and trust the dog to go out and find that entry.

After the performance of the weave poles there is again an opportunity to send the dog to and over the two jumps on the approach to the A-frame. There is a real possibility that the dog will draw in to the pipe tunnel after the performance of the weave poles and jump. The handler must keep pressure out after jump #9 to have prospects for success. This is not featured on our training videos. But it might be an independent exercise to be incorporated either with the weave poles or the approach to the A-frame.

Exercise #4 ~ A-frame / Pipe Tunnel Discrimination

A discrimination might be solved by handling. The discrimination might also be solved by training. Imagine if we trained our dogs to understand which obstacle to be performed based on the command given on the approach. We want to understand both handling and training as we approach this exercise.

After the A-frame, jump and tunnel the sequencing is fairly straight-forward. The dog take another two jumps out and around the pipe tunnel, and then is finally turned abruptly into that pipe tunnel. The finish of the course is jump and tire to finish!

Semi-Pro to Pro Agility

At some point we might be satisfied with the grind after titles and little cloth ribbons approach to our play of this game; and maybe we’ll be ready for the next step. Imagine dog agility that gives substantial cash rewards to the top performers. The National Dog Agility League is contemplating just such an approach to dog agility.

The starting point is league play. We invite anyone who would like to play to join us. We have about 20 clubs in four different countries playing with us now. We believe in YouTube recording of our performances! It’s fun to see how other players in different parts of the world approach the solution to simple coursework.

More information about semi-professional and professional dog agility will be revealed!

Oh, it’s easy to join the NDAL. We have a $10 dog registration (which is kept by the host club)… and we charge a meager $1/dog recording fee. You are welcome to begin play with the 60×90 Masters course we have trained with here. Download the scorekeeping worksheet… and you become a member of the league when you post results!

We have four leagues running each month. Each is based on the size of the working space and the level of challenge. You can download the scorekeeping worksheet for each below:

50×50 ~ International

50×70 ~ Fun and Flowing

60×90 ~ Masters

36×85 ~ Fun and Flowing

Editor’s Note

I originally wrote this post with outlinks to YouTube. Being a bit slow on the uptake, after getting a bit of feedback about how cumbersome it is to follow the conversation with multiple processes and windows open; I sat down with some Bing (Google) research on how to embed a link to a YouTube video. Consequently, I learned something important that will become my new method. And, I have taken the liberty to go back to this post and edit it for inline display of the link to YouTube. I may very well go back and edit about a hundred WordPress Posts to make this fix.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Training With NDAL

July 24, 2016

Courses published by the National Dog Agility League are intended to be resources for training, recreation, and competition. For a moment I would like to focus on the “training” element.

An NDAL course is always open. What that means is that a club can set up a published NDAL course and run it at any time. When the results are reported, all of the new results are commingled with all existing (and historical) results.

The wickedly clever training director will immediately grasp the implications of this for both setting training objectives and measuring the results of that training. A training center might run a particular course, every other year for years. It would be a fascinating study to compare results for individual dogs over those runs and reruns. And I don’t mean just compare scores… look at the advancing skills of the team and the partnership between dog and handler.

Of course it’s very fun that our reporting includes a field for a YouTube recording. And so comparison of performance is substantially visual.

50×70 Fun & Flow

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Training objectives can be wide-ranging. On a course like this I could write forty different lesson plans all having different objectives and lessons.

It is somewhat serendipitous that this course offers a challenge that is prominently featured in a training program we have for our young dog Cedar. Specifically, we are engaged in “Named obstacle discrimination” training. This is a thing that I have documented in detailed manner in the pages of The Joker’s Notebook (the distance training series I sell on my web-store).

It is very important to understand that words in a book are meaningless unless they are taken in a purposeful manner to the real world and become a part of a dog’s training. It’s not enough to understand how to do it. You actually have to do the training to own (or deserve) the objective skills of that training.

Okay, on the 50×70 course I’m interested in the transitions through jumps #13 and #14 and the approach to the A-frame at #15. This challenge dovetails nicely with my ongoing training with Cedar. Following are two recording sessions I’ve taken with her. She’s nearly two years old now… so it’s time for some nifty skills:

Part One ~ I took this video about a week into Cedar’s training on Named Obstacles. She struggled to understand what I was asking for. My response when she guesses wrong is as important and meaningful to the training progression as is my response when she guesses right!

Part Two ~ This video was taken within a couple days of our league team running the 50×70 Fun & Flow course. Cedar is looking pretty good! That doesn’t mean I get to stop or rest in this training regimen. I continue to make the skill solid and permanent; and I need to introduce generalization.

Teaching Classes

So it’s important to understand that I can’t make “Named Obstacle Discrimination” the core focus for our advanced handling class. Think about it, I’ve been doing two-a-day sessions for several weeks with Cedar. I did the same foundation training with my boy Kory (circa six years ago). I cannot cram all of that into a two hour class for my students. It would just frustrate the crap out of them. I can suggest the training methodology…

However, making suggestions of training objectives and methodology does not constitute a proper training agenda for an advanced handling class.

So I’m going to use this opportunity to steal from the competition!

The Competition

I mentioned the YouTube recordings included in NDAL results and reporting… I really like that I can see how others solve course challenges. This intelligence might well direct our own training efforts. Allow me to give an example:

AQ4U’s Fast & Furryous in Louisville, KY has reported for the July 2016 50×70 NDAL Fast & Fun league. We will share the YouTube recording of Blade, a Border Collie run by Brian Wakefield. Blade finished this course with zero faults in a time of 23.44 seconds: https://youtu.be/MxYxaqvXD4c

Brian’s run with really quite excellent! I want to show this to my students, and see how they might solve the opening with Brian’s approach.

First of all, Brian opened the course with a very aggressive flat angle approach to the first jump in order to straighten out the opening line as much as possible.

The bit that I find most fascinating, however, is the #3 to #4 transition. What Brian does here is what I call a do-se-do Blind Cross. On a regular Blind cross the handler changes sides forward of the dog from on the inside of the curve. In the do-se-do Blind Cross the handler changes sides from the outside of the curve! I’ve never completely understood why the do-se-do actually works, but it nearly always does.

Some of you know that we’ve been studying the Back Pass. There is a strong relationship between a Blind Cross and a Back Pass. The chief difference is that the Blind Cross is relative, and the Back Pass is absolute. [[I know that I should explain at length… but I’m already in the middle of explaining something else, at length.]]

Anyhow for our class on league play night we’ll talk about and practice both the Blind Cross and the Back Pass.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

July 2016 League Play

July 10, 2016

The National Dog Agility League is going more broadly international in July, with a club in Australia beginning play, and with clubs in South Africa and New Zealand studying when they might begin. It turns out that they have winter in July down in New Zealand. So that club needs to get past the cold and frightful weather.

We also have a new club in Colorado beginning in July (BowWowz Dog Sports in Colorado Springs). Competition is starting to heat up!

60×90 Masters

I’ve finally set up the NDAL 60×90 Masters-league course in our training building. I thought that I would share it and maybe talk about the “interesting” bits. As you can see, this is a course that I designed. Next month we’ve invited Dennis Vogel (Cloud Nine in New Hope, MN) to be our game master.

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The opening is fairly straightforward but begs for diligent work, with a tight wrap off of the tire into the #4 tunnel (the A-frame inviting the wrong-course). The handler has to be thinking about which side to work on the approach to jump #5. Dog-on-right might work; but there’s more to go wrong with it than dog-on-left.

The handler might also be thinking about his position on the dogs dismount of the weave poles. The #7-9 serpentine offers two distinct wrong-course options. And frankly the game is won and lost in quick little jumping sequences like this. The dog might do the three jumps turning neat… or he could forge in wide & wobbly turns.

We’ll have a bit of fun with the closing. It is an odd mixture of opening te dog up into full extension, and then drawing him into collection. For example… from jump #9 and most of the way to jump #11 the dog should be in full stride. But the handler wants to put him in a lower gear on the landing side of jump #11 to turn neatly towards the next jump (and away from the weave poles); and cause him to continue to tuck in after jump #8 to get to the nearer entry to the #13 pipe tunnel.

Out of the pipe tunnel the handler has to give a turning cue to the left with some likelihood that he’s on the side away from the turn.

It’s a lovely course and should be a lot of fun to run. This course will be judged on a Time, Plus Faults basis.

36×85 Fun & Flowing

NDAL courses are based on the size of the working space. And, you’ll note, each has a theme. To my own thinking “Fun & Flowing” means that it doesn’t have a bunch of wicked technical challenges that require the intrusive micro-management of the dog by his handler.

That being said there should be an element of challenge. Fun is like an adrenaline rush, like riding a roller coaster. I don’t know if I pulled it off in the design:

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This course features two counter-side tunnels [that’s when the dog’s logical path has him approaching one side of a u-shaped pipe tunnel; but the judge has put the number on the other side.] Aside from those features this course is pretty much a collection of pin-wheel sequencing.

On both performances of the#4/13 pipe tunnel the handler needs to step in and get the dog aimed in a direction other that where the pipe tunnel was pointing.

 

Nesting

We will do the 50×50 International and the 50×70 Fun & Flow courses on a different night. I’m afraid your game master made a terrible nesting mistake. I’m sure some of the clubs will catch this mistake if they try to run more than one on the same day/night.

50×70 Fun & Flow

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There’s certainly a serpentine kind of theme going in this course. And by definition there might be (could be? Should be?) multiple changes of sides and changes of direction, all with the dog working at near best speed.

The most overt technical challenge is probably the tunnel discrimination on the approach to the A-frame at #15. This will certainly give us an opportunity to make the “discrimination” a training topic in class.

50×50 International

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As the name implies the 50×50 is focused on rather tough “international” skills. I don’t believe what I’ve designed here is oppressive. And I’ve certainly tried to create logical flow. Of course the interesting moments are those that defy logic. On this course the key challenges are clearly: the very tough approach to the weave poles; the pull through from jump #9 back to the tunnel; and the backside performance of jump #12.

The National Dog Agility League

The league continues a wonderful pattern of slow growth. We’re working on automation to allow players in the league to query stats and standing. A new league series begins right now! You can get the lowdown on the NDAL blog.

Blog1145 NDAL

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Every Day is Saturday

July 2, 2016

The other day I say to myself… what day is this? And that convinced voice at the back of my brain answers “It’s Saturday,” … “every day is Saturday”. Okay, I know that’s an exaggeration. I’m as busy now as I’ve ever been. I reckon I don’t know how to be unbusy. But don’t you know there’s time for gardening and fishing and this ‘n that projects.

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I made a bit of time to reconstruct the frame for this ancient whetstone, as the old stand had completely degraded in the weather. I was very faithful to the original design specs. I was pleased to use old oak true 2′ by 4′ wood from a carriage house demolished down in Watertown a few years ago.

The National Dog Agility League

The league continues a wonderful pattern of slow growth. We’re working on automation to allow players in the league to query stats and standing. A new league series begins right now! You can get the lowdown on the NDAL blog.

Blog1144 NDAL

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Dogs Don’t Whisper

June 9, 2016

I intend no criticism of Cesar Milan. While he is a bit hard-handed for my liking, he brings basic dog training discipline to befuddled dog lovers. To his credit, Cesar has the good grace to sound slightly embarrassed when he calls himself “the Dog Whisperer.” After all, dogs don’t whisper.

I don’t much buy into the concept of the dog training “guru”. The mysticism of the magic touch is largely fabricated mythology. In the sport of dog agility most so-called gurus work with Border Collies, a breed whose capacity for compensatory learning is plain awesome.

Beyond the perennial flash-in-the-pan agility expert there is deeply entrenched permanent agility guru caste. They’ll sell you books, handling systems, online training adventures, and seminars and private lessons.

Oh, everybody needs to make a living. I’m not going to begrudge.

Don’t get me wrong. The agility savant with 10,000-hour-eyes is a great resource. But he/she’s a coach, not a guru.

League Play

The National Dog Agility League continues to grow. It’s a fun concept. Each club or franchise puts up the same courses each month… and we roll up all the results as a single competition. Team scores are comprised from the scores of the top five dogs in a club. Obviously the more dogs the franchise runs, the better are the top five scores. Contact me if you’d like to play.

BLOG1138 This is a fun romp. I confess to being the designer. And don’t you know I believe in my heart that any course designer visualized himself (or herself, as it were) in the context of performance. And so it’s natural that we each will design to our own strengths and shy from our weaknesses. That being said, this is a course that is subtly challenging and is an interesting test the handler’s skill as architect of the dog’s path.

The calculus of the opening has all to do with getting the dog into the proper entry to the pipe tunnel at #10. And so the handler may study the opportunity to have dog-on-left at the weave poles. With this in mind, there’s plenty that can go wrong with the opening. The handler may not put sufficient pressure on the #4 jump; and may fail to pre-cue the left turn after. And after jump #5 the dog is presented with a wrong-course option at the #16 jump. And back-crossing the weave poles (if that’s the plan) might bobble the entry.

Having survived the opening sequence into the weave poles the handler should attempt to turn the dog neatly at the #7 jump. A wrong course beckons at jump #12. But more problematic is that the dog’s path through jumps #14 and #15 clearly presents the dog with the wrong end of the pipe tunnel at #16.

The handler might consider a vee-set approach to the #9 jump that changes the dog’s trajectory through the jump so that the correct tunnel entry is presented. This is a moment that begs for considerable precision.

On the dismount of the dogwalk the handler will conduct the dog on a long and flat serpentine of jumps. Note that the weave poles are powerfully presented to the dog as a wrong course option after jump #13.

Through jumps #14 and #15 the dog will be in considerable extension. Thus jumps #15 to #18 should not be taken for granted as the dog’s turning radius may affect a loopy wobble, or might resolve to a neat and clean line if the handler manages to pre-cue the turn.

Seriously, if you’ve survived all that has gone before, the least you can do now is tag the yellow paint on the downside of the A-frame and, as the handler, give convincing pressure through the final jump.

The Agility Model

The original invention of agility was based on a somewhat flawed model which has cascaded into a grossly expensive hobby.

The game as it is played today is an interesting commingling of equestrian sports and American-style obedience titling. The failure of the model is that a Champion never actually has to win anything. It’s all based on performance against a standard.

The typical scoring basis for agility is Faults, Then Time. This too is probably flawed because it doesn’t deliver an accurate comparison of performance. Think about it, an amazing dog with wicked skills misses a contact by 2″ and receives a score of “E”… as though he never existed. And the award goes to a compliant dog of moderate pace that is dragged around the course Velcro’d to his handler’s hip. Were the scoring basis Time, Plus Faults (and the fault for missing the contact is a reasonable deduction in time)… then the truly agile dog would earn the higher score. The performance that makes the heart soar should take precedence over the irrational standard.

You’ll be happy to know that league play in the National Dog Agility League subscribes to the Time, Plus Faults scoring basis.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.